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IN3920

GREEN JADE SHRIMP (neocaridina denticulata. Var)

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Green shrimp taxonomy can be a little confusing: there are actually three types of green dwarf shrimp out there. This can lead to some mislabeling. Here, we will be discussing the easiest green dwarf shrimp to keep in the aquarium. This Neocaridina davidi variety features intense green coloration but is just as easy to care for as cherry shrimp, which are usually considered the ideal starter shrimp. 

 

Care for green shrimp is pretty much the same as other Neocaridina davidi varieties. These shrimp are undemanding, easy to keep and perfect if you're just getting into the shrimp hobby.

To start your green shrimp colony you'll need an aquarium of at least around 5 gallons. If you're an experienced aquarist you can also go a little smaller, but keep in mind that the smaller the tank, the more problematic any water quality issues will be. You'll need a filter to cycle the tank and keep it shrimp-safe. A heater is recommended if the ambient temperature tends to fluctuate. That's it!

All shrimp need plenty of hides and decorations to feel safe. This doesn't have to be anything fancy: some tubes can be enough to provide your green shrimp with a sense of security. It's also a good idea to add plenty of live plants for them to hide in and forage on. If that sounds challenging, don't worry. There are plenty of easy plants out there.

Green shrimp aren't fussy about water quality and your tap water should usually be fine (as long as it's properly conditioned). Slightly acidic and soft water is preferred but the shrimp should be forgiving about somewhat harder water.

All this doesn't mean you don't have to keep a close eye on your water quality, though. Despite their hardiness green shrimp are still very sensitive to ammonia, nitrites and, to a lesser degree, nitrates. This means your tank should always be fully cycled before you even consider adding any shrimp and you should do regular maintenance in the form of water changes.

You can monitor your water quality using a liquid test kit. If anything is off, do a water change immediately and keep testing daily until you're sure everything is fine.

https://www.theshrimpfarm.com/posts/shrimp-caresheet-green-shrimp-neocaridina/